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Cardi B Demands Justice For Black Americans In Interview With Joe Biden Ahead Of DNC

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  Cardi B sat down withpresumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden in an Elle magazine interview published Monday to discuss her main interests in the upcoming election.

The interview comes ahead of the four-day 2020 Democratic National Convention, which kicks off Monday night and will be addressing the theme of unity. Former President Barack Obama and former First Lady Michelle Obama are slated to deliver Monday’s final speeches.

“I want Black people to stop getting killed and no justice for it. I’m sick of it. I just want laws that are fair to Black citizens and fair to cops, too,” Cardi said

Cardi expresses sympathy is not enough in the fight for racial justice – she’s calling for equality and systemic change.

 

“We’re not asking for charity – we are just asking for equality. We are asking for fairness, and we are asking for justice,” Cardi said. “That is all. I feel like everything people are asking for is getting interpreted in a very different way. No, it’s simple: We just want justice. We want to feel like Americans.”

Biden believes this is a plausible request, explaining that he is “so optimistic” about our generation.

“You’re the smartest, the best educated, the least prejudiced, and the most engaged generation in history. And you’re going to change things,” he said.

 

Cardi B and Biden also discussed the current state of racial injustice under President Donald Trump’s administration, with the 27-year old rapper expressing hope for a leader who can clean up the “racism (that) has always existed.”

“This prejudice is dangerous. It could be the start of a civil war. It makes people feel uncomfortable around different people. Nobody wants to feel targeted. Nobody wants animosity,” Cardi said.

 

Cardi added “everybody just wants the best for themselves” in a world where we “just work with each other.”

 

“I don’t want to (have to) tell my kid, ‘You have to be careful going to the store. Don’t wear a hoodie. Please don’t get stopped.’ We don’t want that,” she said. “And I don’t want to feel a certain type of animosity toward a different race, because I feel like they get it easier than us. Nobody wants to feel like that.”

 

Source USA Today

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Cardi B Interviews Joe Biden About 2020 Presidential Election

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Cardi and  and democratic 2020 presidential nominee Joe Biden  have teamed up for a special interview  for a discussion on a variety of  issues.

The interview, conducted in a social distancing-friendly manner via Elle and published Monday, sees Biden first congratulating Cardi for her recent appearance on the cover of the publication. From there, the two waste no time in discussing how integral it is to boot Trump from the White House.

“I don’t want someone to lie to me and tell me that it’s okay not to wear a mask, that everything is going to be okay,” Cardi, who also called for healthcare reform during the discussion, said. “I want a president to tell me what the steps are for us to get better, to tell me, ‘This is why it is taking so long, this is why other countries are doing better than ours.'”

 

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It’s the remix! Presenting Cardi B and Joey B—the collaboration you didn’t see coming. In an exclusive interview for our September issue, @iamcardiB sits down with @joebiden to discuss Medicare, free college tuition, and the fight for racial justice.“I feel like Black people, we’re not asking for sympathy,” she tells the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, “We’re not asking for charity—we are just asking for equality. It’s simple: We want to feel like Americans.” Watch the full conversation at the link in bio. ELLE September 2020 Editor-in-Chief: @ninagarcia⁣ Talent: @iamcardib⁣ In conversation with @joebiden⁣ Photographer: @stevenkleinstudio⁣ Stylist: @kollincarter⁣ Fashion Director: @alexwhiteedits⁣ Creative Director: Stephen Gan⁣ Entertainment Director: Jennifer Weisel⁣ Hair: @tokyostylez⁣ Makeup: @Erika_lapearl_mua⁣ Nails: @nailson7th⁣ Set Design: Mary Howard & Kyle Hagemeier @mhs_artists Production: Travis Kiewel & Roberto Javier Sosa @thatoneproduction⁣ Top: @balenciaga ⁣ Headpiece: @kerenwolf

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Lebron James Teams Up With L.A. Dodgers To Make Dodger Stadium A Voting Center

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Lebron James Teams is using his platform to create change . James is teaming  up  with the  L.A. Dodgers To Make Dodger Stadium A Voting Center so that help stop voter suppression and help more people have access to voting.

It was abbounced thatThe Dodger stadium will be transformed into a voting center in November for the 2020 Presidential election with the help of LeBron James’ More Than a Vote group. The NBA star’s organization joined forces with the Los Angeles Dodgers to make this initiative come to life. This is the first Major League Baseball team to offer their facility, and hopefully, others will follow suit.

Besides audience-less baseball games, the stadium has been used for coronavirus testing and food distribution recently. “Dodger Stadium is part of the fabric of Los Angeles, and we’re proud to continue to partner with the County to make the property available for the benefit of the community at large,” Dodger president and CEO Stan Kasten said in a news release on Thursday. “Voting is all of our civic duty, and we’re excited to work with More than a Vote to do anything we can to help get out the vote by making this process as easy, accessible and safe for all Angelenos.”

 

Voters will have access to vote beginning on October 29th. That’s five whole days before Election Day which is November 3rd.

“I may still be new to L.A. but it didn’t take long for me to learn how special the relationship is between the Dodgers and Lakers,” said LeBron James in a statement. “We are all in this together. “I’m really proud we were able to help the Dodgers become the first MLB stadium to open for voting. This is exactly why we created More Than a Vote. A lot of us now working together and here for every team who wants to follow the Dodgers lead and turn their stadium into a safer place for voting.”

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Rihanna Uses Artwork To Encourage Fans To Vote

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Rihanna took to social media and uses art to encourage her fanbase to vote in the upcoming United States presidential elections. The Beauty business woman  posted art   with spray-painted words “F— TRUMP” in a series of colorful graffiti photos posted on Instagram Friday night (Aug. 14). The graffiti artist wore an oversized “psychedelic” Fenty hoodie.

“art,” Rihanna captioned the image, adding the hashtag #81 days.

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art. #81days

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Taylor Swift Tells Fans To Vote Early Because Trump Opposes Mail-In Voting

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On Saturday Taylor Swift  took to twitter to post a message to her fans  and encouraged them to  Vote early.

Swift who recently released a new album encouraged her fans that due to the  recent changes by the US Postal Service, including reducing operating hours and removing letter collection boxes. 
they must vote early. Taylor  blamed  these changes directly on President Donald Trump.
“Trump’s calculated dismantling of USPS proves one thing clearly: He is WELL AWARE that we do not want him as our president. He’s chosen to blatantly cheat and put millions of Americans’ lives at risk in an effort to hold on to power,” she said.

 

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NBA Foundation Created, Pledges $300 Million To Black Growth

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The NBA’s Board of Governors and the National Basketball Players Association have finalized plans to create the first NBA Foundation that will work to spur economic growth in the Black community, announcing Wednesday that the initial contribution will be $300 million over the next decade.

Each team will donate $1 million annually, or $30 million collectively, over those 10 years. An eight-person Board of Directors will be installed, with four of those seats going to representatives from the board of governors, three seats to NBPA players and executives, and one to the league office.

NBPA President Chris Paul had said earlier in the season restart at Walt Disney World that $300 million would be the start, and now those plans are complete.

“All NBA team governors recognize our unique position to effect change and we are committed to supporting and empowering young Black men and women in each of our team markets as well as communities across the U.S. and Canada,” NBA Board of Governors Chairman and Toronto Raptors Governor Larry Tanenbaum said.

The league said the charity would be public and that the foundation would work to deepen “the NBA family’s commitment to racial equality and social justice.” Those missions have been front-and-center at the restart at Walt Disney World, where games are played on courts with “Black Lives Matter” painted on them and about 85 percent of players are choosing to have a social justice message on their jerseys for the remainder of the season.

“Education. Scholarship. Economic Opportunity. These are the three main areas of our social responsibility work at Monumental Sports & Entertainment and where we personally invest in our community,” Washington Wizards owner Ted Leonsis said. “Which is why we fully endorse the NBA’s plan to create a charitable foundation and are pledging $1 million every year for the next 10 years to fund skills training, mentorship, coaching and pipeline development to create employment and career advancement in Black communities.”

The foundation’s mission is “to drive economic empowerment for Black communities through employment and career advancement” for high school, college-aged and career-ready Black men and women, plus aid organizations that offer training and mentoring. Efforts will be centered on helping people get a first job, finding careers after high school or college, then career advancement.

“Given the resources and incredible platform of the NBA, we have the power to ideate, implement and support substantive policies that reflect the core principles of equality and justice we embrace,” NBPA Executive Director Michele Roberts said

 

Article : NBC

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NBA Players Took A Knee Before Kicking Off The League’s Reopened Season

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Every NBA player who restarted the NBA’s season on Thursday kneeled during the National Anthem, wearing “Black Lives Matter” shirts.

Moments before tipoff on Thursday evening, players with the New Orleans Pelicans and the Utah Jazz, joined by coaches and game officials, all took a knee.
The Los Angeles Lakers and Los Angeles Clippers followed suit ahead of their game in Orlando.
On some game jerseys, players’ names were replaced with messages, such as “Equality,” “I am a man,” “Ally,” and “Say her name,” sending a clear message in support of the social justice movement.
“I respect our teams’ unified act of peaceful protest for social justice and under these unique circumstances will not enforce our long-standing rule requiring standing during the playing of our national anthem.”
The New Orleans Pelicans, in a statement, said the team stands by the “ideals of freedom of speech and the right to peacefully protest.”
“Collectively with the Utah Jazz, our organization joins the NBA in supporting our players and coaches. To promote meaningful change relative to social justice and racial equality, the New Orleans Pelicans have partnered with our players, staff and coaches to create a Social Justice Leadership Alliance committed to furthering the discussion, listening and learning and taking action to make positive change in our community and our country,” it said.
The Jazz stated the team is “committed to advancing social justice and stand in support of the players, coaches and staff as they exercise their First Amendment rights, and use their voices, their experiences, and their platforms to peacefully express themselves.”

Demonstrations throughout sports leagues

The NBA isn’t the first league to restart their season with players kneeling in support of the movement.
The WNBA, when the league began its season last week, dedicated the season to Breonna Taylor and the Say Her Name campaign. Outside of basketball, many MLB players also took a knee as their season resumed earlier this month.
All of these demonstrations come amid unrest in the US over the deaths of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and George Floyd, and mirror that of Colin Kaepernick during the 2016-17 NFL season.
The deaths have caused ongoing protests throughout the country, and resulted in calls for racial equality, social justice and police reform in the US, among other demands.

Coronavirus protections

The NBA returned after a 20-week hiatus to a so-called bubble, in Orlando, Florida.
Amid the pandemic, the league took precautions Thursday to protect against coronavirus. The scorer’s table was surrounded by plexiglass, for example.
Team benches also consisted of multiple rows of seats — with appropriate distance between each seat — and were divided into three sections: players; coaches and team staff.
During any timeout or period break, players and coaches could still huddle like normal, but they had to sit in or congregate around movable chairs apart from the team benches. The chairs used during timeouts or period breaks were cleaned and disinfected after each use.
The Los Angeles Lakers and the Los Angeles Clippers took their game down to the wire on Thursday — just like the Utah Jazz and New Orleans Pelicans did earlier in the night.
LeBron James was clutch at the end. First, he scored what turned out to be the game-winning shot by getting the offensive rebound on his own missed shot and laying it in. On the other end of the floor, he defended the Clippers two stars, Kawhi Leonard and then Paul George, to deny the Clippers from scoring. The Lakers would win, 103-101.
The league shut down on March 11 when — just moments before the Utah Jazz were to take on the Thunder in Oklahoma City — it was learned that Jazz center Rudy Gobert had tested positive for Covid-19.
On Thursday night, when play resumed, it was fitting that Gobert scored the first basket in a layup and hit what would be the game-winning free throws, in Utah’s 106-104 win against the Pelicans.
“Life works in mysterious ways,” Gobert said. “I’m just happy, blessed to be able to be back on the court, to do what I love to do, to be back out there with my teammates and try to win a game.”
Article By : CNN
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Rep. John Lewis’ Casket Crosses Selma’s Edmund Pettus Bridge

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John Lewis’ casket was just taken from the historic Brown Chapel AME Church here in Selma and placed onto a horse-drawn carriage, which will now carry his body one last time across the Edmund Pettus Bridge, where Lewis was infamously beaten in 1965. The Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., is where the civil rights icon first helped lead a march for voting rights in 1965 –>John Lewis to be carried across Edmund Pettus Bridge for final time

 

 

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Michael B. Jordan Launches #ChangeHollywood, Calls For Industry Change

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Actor Michael B. Jordan is partnering with Color of Change to launch the #ChangeHollywood initiative that creates a roadmap for how the industry can better invest in Black stories, talent and communities.

The plan lays out tangible ways that Hollywood can invest in anti-racist content as well as reinvest police funds to instead support Black communities.

Companies, executive leadership, staff and talent participating in the roadmap will be provided with recommendations and forthcoming resources for directories, templates, analysis, taskforce convenings, writers’ rooms, consulting sessions and other emerging ideas.

The key aspects of the roadmap, which you view in full here, include:

Investing in anti-racist content and authentic Black stories through educational materials, resource lists and content creation support Investing in Black talent and careers with advancements in recruitment, hiring practices, trainings and transparent disclosures Shifting investment in police towards investment in Black communities, including advocating for independent security, support for Black owned businesses, financial support of community-led programing and new streams of communication between the industry and Black communities.

“The legacy of racism in Hollywood is long and unforgivable: excluding Black talent, silencing Black voices, derailing Black careers, and using the economic power of the industry to prop up police who target and enact violence on Black communities,” Rashad Robinson, president of Color Of Change, said in a statement. “We know from our advocacy that the industry won’t change on it’s own, so we’re building off our current work to hold Hollywood accountable to offer these resources and a roadmap toward enacting racial justice. From the writers’ rooms to the streets, we are energized and ready to help Hollywood follow through on their statements that Black lives matter.”

 

 

“This roadmap is just the beginning of the journey to racial justice. We are all accomplices in the fight to transform Hollywood, and we invite content creators and industry leaders to join us in working together to #ChangeHollywood,” Jordan, CEO of Outlier Society, said in a statement. “We look forward to including a variety of voices in doing what we do best: telling authentic stories, bringing people together, partnering with influential artists, and changing the rules of the game.”

Jordan’s Outlier Society and Color Of Change have already begun conversations with companies like WME and Endeavor Content and organizations like BLD PWR about commitments to this initiative, with more details to come.

The #ChangeHollywood initiative is urging everyone in the industry to make bold moves to affirm, defend and invest in Black lives through honest storytelling, value-aligned financial investment and systemic change within the industry.

Read original story Michael B Jordan and Color of Change Aim to #ChangeHollywood With Investment in Black Stories and Talent At TheWrap

 

 

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Congressman & Civil Rights Legend John Lewis Has died @ age 80

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Civil rights legend and Georgia congressman Rep. John Lewis has died at the age of 80 at his home in Atlanta, ABC News confirmed Friday night. John Lewis, an icon in civil rights movement whose bloody beating by Alabama state troopers in 1965 helped galvanize opposition to racial segregation, and who went on to a long and celebrated career in Congress, has died. He was 80.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi confirmed Lewis’ passing late Friday night, calling him “one of the greatest heroes of American history.”

“All of us were humbled to call Congressman Lewis a colleague, and are heartbroken by his passing,” Pelosi said. “May his memory be an inspiration that moves us all to, in the face of injustice, make ‘good trouble, necessary trouble.'”

The condolences for Lewis were bipartisan. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Lewis was “a pioneering civil rights leader who put his life on the line to fight racism, promote equal rights, and bring our nation into greater alignment with its founding principles. ”

Lewis’s announcement in late December 2019 that he had been diagnosed with advanced pancreatic cancer – “I have never faced a fight quite like the one I have now,” he said – inspired tributes from both sides of the aisle, and an unstated accord that the likely passing of this Atlanta Democrat would represent the end of an era.

The announcement of his death came just hours after the passing of the Rev. C.T. Vivian, another civil rights leader who died early Friday at 95.

“An image of God and democracy”

Lewis was the youngest and last survivor of the Big Six civil rights activists, a group led by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. that had the greatest impact on the movement. He was best known for leading some 600 protesters in the Bloody Sunday march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma.

At age 25 – walking at the head of the march with his hands tucked in the pockets of his tan overcoat – Lewis was knocked to the ground and beaten by police. His skull was fractured, and nationally televised images of the brutality forced the country’s attention on racial oppression in the South.

Within days, King led more marches in the state, and President Lyndon Johnson soon was pressing Congress to pass the Voting Rights Act. The bill became law later that year, removing barriers that had barred Blacks from voting.

“He loved this country so much that he risked his life and its blood so that it might live up to its promise,” President Barack Obama said after Lewis’ death. “Early on, he embraced the principles of nonviolent resistance and civil disobedience as the means to bring about real change in this country.”

Lewis joined King and four other civil rights leaders in organizing the 1963 March on Washington. He spoke to the vast crowd just before King delivered his epochal “I Have a Dream” speech.

A 23-year-old firebrand, Lewis toned down his intended remarks at the insistence of others, dropping a reference to a “scorched earth” march through the South and scaling back criticisms of President John Kennedy. It was a potent speech nonetheless, in which he vowed: “By the forces of our demands, our determination and our numbers, we shall splinter the segregated South into a thousand pieces and put them together in an image of God and democracy.”

It was almost immediately, and forever, overshadowed by the words of King, the man who had inspired him to activism.

 

Inspired by the king

Lewis was born on Feb. 21, 1940, outside the town of Troy, in Pike County, Alabama. He grew up on his family’s farm and attended segregated public schools.

As a boy, he wanted to be a minister, and practiced his oratory on the family chickens. Denied a library card because of the color of his skin, he became an avid reader, and could cite obscure historical dates and details even in his later years. He was a teenager when he first heard King preaching on the radio. They met when Lewis was seeking support to become the first Black student at Alabama’s segregated Troy State University.

He ultimately attended the American Baptist Theological Seminary and Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee. He began organizing sit-in demonstrations at whites-only lunch counters and volunteering as a Freedom Rider, enduring beatings and arrests while traveling around the South to challenge segregation.

FILE – In this March 17, 1965 file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., fourth from left, foreground, locks arms with his aides as he leads a march of several thousands to the court house in Montgomery, Ala. From left are: an unidentified woman, Rev. Ralph Abernathy, James Foreman, King, Jesse Douglas, Sr., and John Lewis. (AP Photo/File)

Lewis helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and was named its chairman in 1963, making him one of the Big Six at a tender age. The others, in addition to King, were Whitney Young of the National Urban League; A. Philip Randolph of the Negro American Labor Council; James L. Farmer Jr., of the Congress of Racial Equality; and Roy Wilkins of the NAACP. All six met at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York to plan and announce the March on Washington.

The huge demonstration galvanized the movement, but success didn’t come quickly. After extensive training in nonviolent protest, Lewis and the Rev. Hosea Williams led demonstrators on a planned march of more than 50 miles from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama’s capital, on March 7, 1965. A phalanx of police blocked their exit from the Selma bridge.

Authorities shoved, then swung their truncheons, fired tear gas and charged on horseback, sending many to the hospital and horrifying much of the nation. King returned with thousands, completing the march to Montgomery before the end of the month.

Turning to politics

Lewis turned to politics in 1981, when he was elected to the Atlanta City Council.

He won his seat in Congress in 1986 and spent much of his career in the minority. After Democrats won control of the House in 2006, Lewis became his party’s senior deputy whip, a behind-the-scenes leadership post in which he helped keep the party unified.

FILE – In this Tuesday night, Sept. 3, 1986 file photo, John Lewis, left, and his wife, Lillian, holding hands, lead a march of supporters from his campaign headquartes to an Atlanta hotel for a victory party after he defeated Julian Bond in a run-off election for Georgia’s Fifth Congressional District seat in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Linda Schaeffer)

In an early setback for Barack Obama’s 2008 Democratic primary campaign, Lewis endorsed Hillary Rodham Clinton for the nomination. Lewis switched when it became clear Obama had overwhelming Black support. Obama later honored Lewis with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and they marched hand in hand in Selma on the 50th anniversary of the Bloody Sunday attack.

President Bill Clinton and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Friday praised Lewis as a “giant” who became “the conscience of the nation.”

Lewis also worked for 15 years to gain approval for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. Humble and unfailingly friendly, Lewis was revered on Capitol Hill – but as one of the most liberal members of Congress, he often lost policy battles, from his effort to stop the Iraq War to his defense of young immigrants.

He met bipartisan success in Congress in 2006 when he led efforts to renew the Voting Rights Act, but the Supreme Court later invalidated much of the law, and it became once again what it was in his youth, a work in progress. Later, when the presidency of Donald Trump challenged his civil rights legacy, Lewis made no effort to hide his pain.

“Stand up and speak up”

Lewis refused to attend Trump’s inauguration, saying he didn’t consider him a “legitimate president” because Russians had conspired to get him elected. When Trump later complained about immigrants from “s—hole countries,” Lewis declared, “I think he is a racist … we have to try to stand up and speak up and not try to sweep it under the rug.”

Lewis said he’d been arrested 40 times in the 1960s, five more as a congressman. At 78, he told a rally he’d do it again to help reunite immigrant families separated by the Trump administration.

“There cannot be any peace in America until these young children are returned to their parents and set all of our people free,” Lewis said in June, recalling the “good trouble” he got into protesting segregation as a young man.

“If we fail to do it, history will not be kind to us,” he shouted. “I will go to the border. I’ll get arrested again. If necessary, I’m prepared to go to jail.”

 

In a speech the day of the House impeachment vote of Trump, Lewis explained the importance of that vote.

“When you see something that is not right, not just, not fair, you have a moral obligation to say something, to do something. Our children and their children will ask us ‘what did you do? what did you say?” While the vote would be hard for some, he said: “We have a mission and a mandate to be on the right side of history.”

Lewis’ wife of four decades, Lillian Miles, died in 2012. They had one son, John Miles Lewis.

 

 

 

 

 

Article By : abc13

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